echo ''; Clamorworld » In everyday life every one of us comes across various experiences, incidents which we either don’t share with anyone or share with family members and friends. Print media, electronic media and various medium shows the news, but its ends up showing one sided of the story. We never come to know the other side of story. With so much happening every day, every second across our neighborhood, society, and world it’s difficult for the news media to cover all the news. Many times we have felt wish we could share our voice, opinion, thoughts with the world. Many a times we have felt the frustration, anger and helplessness for not being able to do anything about an incident. Have you ever felt, for a good cause, you need support, but don’t know how to garner the support and attention. So, now you have an option “www.Clamorworld.com“. This is a platform to share everything you want to. A website 100% runs by the people for the people. The world is waiting to listen to your voice, the voice which has kept you suppressed so far. If you do not want to share the incident, event personally, please send it to us at contact@clamorworld.com, and we will share it on your behalf and assure to keep your name confidential. Let’s make this world a peaceful and a happy place to live. » ‘Dust Lady’: Woman from iconic 9/11 attacks photograph dies

‘Dust Lady’: Woman from iconic 9/11 attacks photograph dies

 

A survivor of the September 11, 2001 attacks on New York who was featured in one of the most iconic photographs of the tragic incident has died of stomach cancer at the age of 42.
The family of Marcy Borders first announced her death Monday on Facebook.

Borders, who was 28 at the time of the attacks, was just one month into a job for Bank of America in one of the Twin Towers.

As one of the towers collapsed, she took refuge in a nearby office building, where AFP photographer Stan Honda took a haunting photo of her completely covered in a thick layer of ash, which earned her the moniker of “The Dust Lady.”

The air appeared heavy and a distraught Borders was shrouded in a cloud of dust and backlit by an eerie yellow luminescence.

“I can’t believe my sister is gone,” her brother Michael Borders wrote on Facebook, asking for people’s prayers.

Her cousin Elnardo Borders wrote: “May God Comfort us in our time of sorrow. My emotions are all over the place right now.”

After the attacks, Borders spiraled into a decade-long deep depression and alcohol and drug abuse, though she eventually recovered after several years.

She lost her job at Bank of America, where she ignored repeated offers of a transfer.

She spent much of her time sequestered in her two-room flat, in one of the poorer parts of Bayonne, a bedroom community in New Jersey over the bridge from Manhattan.

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