echo ''; Clamorworld » In everyday life every one of us comes across various experiences, incidents which we either don’t share with anyone or share with family members and friends. Print media, electronic media and various medium shows the news, but its ends up showing one sided of the story. We never come to know the other side of story. With so much happening every day, every second across our neighborhood, society, and world it’s difficult for the news media to cover all the news. Many times we have felt wish we could share our voice, opinion, thoughts with the world. Many a times we have felt the frustration, anger and helplessness for not being able to do anything about an incident. Have you ever felt, for a good cause, you need support, but don’t know how to garner the support and attention. So, now you have an option “www.Clamorworld.com“. This is a platform to share everything you want to. A website 100% runs by the people for the people. The world is waiting to listen to your voice, the voice which has kept you suppressed so far. If you do not want to share the incident, event personally, please send it to us at contact@clamorworld.com, and we will share it on your behalf and assure to keep your name confidential. Let’s make this world a peaceful and a happy place to live. » Neuroticism may be linked with long life: Study

Neuroticism may be linked with long life: Study

 

Individuals with higher levels of neuroticism — a personality trait associated with negative emotions — are likely to have longer lifespan and lower risk of mortality, regardless of their health conditions, a study has claimed.

Persons with high levels of neuroticism are more likely to experience negative emotions — including irritability, frustration, nervousness, worry, and guilt — compared with those who have lower levels of neuroticism. “Our findings are important because they suggest that being high in neuroticism may sometimes have a protective effect, perhaps by making people more vigilant about their health,” said lead researcher Catharine R. Gale from the University of Edinburgh.

The findings showed that higher neuroticism is linked with slightly lower risk of death from all causes and cancer. However, “we found that this protective effect was only present in people who rated their health as fair or poor”, Gale explained.

“We found that people who scored high on one aspect of neuroticism related to worry and vulnerability had a reduced risk of death regardless of how they rated their health,” Gale said. For the study, published in the journal Psychological Science, the team examined data collected from 502,655 people aged between 37 and 73.

Participants completed a validated personality assessment measuring neuroticism and indicated whether they thought they were in excellent, good, fair or poor health overall.

The data also included information on participants’ health behaviours (smoking, physical activity), physical health (body mass index, blood pressure), cognitive function, and medical diagnoses (heart problems, diabetes, cancer).

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