echo ''; Clamorworld » In everyday life every one of us comes across various experiences, incidents which we either don’t share with anyone or share with family members and friends. Print media, electronic media and various medium shows the news, but its ends up showing one sided of the story. We never come to know the other side of story. With so much happening every day, every second across our neighborhood, society, and world it’s difficult for the news media to cover all the news. Many times we have felt wish we could share our voice, opinion, thoughts with the world. Many a times we have felt the frustration, anger and helplessness for not being able to do anything about an incident. Have you ever felt, for a good cause, you need support, but don’t know how to garner the support and attention. So, now you have an option “www.Clamorworld.com“. This is a platform to share everything you want to. A website 100% runs by the people for the people. The world is waiting to listen to your voice, the voice which has kept you suppressed so far. If you do not want to share the incident, event personally, please send it to us at contact@clamorworld.com, and we will share it on your behalf and assure to keep your name confidential. Let’s make this world a peaceful and a happy place to live. » New species of mayfly discovered in India

New species of mayfly discovered in India

 

WASHINGTON: Scientists have discovered a new species of mayfly in the southern Western Ghats, a mountain range along the west coast of India.

 This is the first time that any mayfly belonging to the genus Labiobaetis has been collected in peninsular India, researchers said.

 The new species, called Labiobaetis soldani, “is named in honour of Dr T Soldan for his substantial contribution to the understanding of the Ephemeroptera of Palaearctic and Oriental realms,” according to the authors of a study that describes the new mayfly in the Journal of Insect Science.

 The larvae have light-brown heads with light-yellow antennae, and they grow to be about 4-5 millimeters in length.

 Adults are also about five millimeters long, and the males and females both lack hind wings.

 Labiobaetis soldani is closely related to Labiobaetis pulchellus, which has been described from Sri Lanka in the larval stage.

 However, it can be differentiated from all other Labiobaetis species described from the Oriental region by several morphological differences.

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