echo ''; Clamorworld » In everyday life every one of us comes across various experiences, incidents which we either don’t share with anyone or share with family members and friends. Print media, electronic media and various medium shows the news, but its ends up showing one sided of the story. We never come to know the other side of story. With so much happening every day, every second across our neighborhood, society, and world it’s difficult for the news media to cover all the news. Many times we have felt wish we could share our voice, opinion, thoughts with the world. Many a times we have felt the frustration, anger and helplessness for not being able to do anything about an incident. Have you ever felt, for a good cause, you need support, but don’t know how to garner the support and attention. So, now you have an option “www.Clamorworld.com“. This is a platform to share everything you want to. A website 100% runs by the people for the people. The world is waiting to listen to your voice, the voice which has kept you suppressed so far. If you do not want to share the incident, event personally, please send it to us at contact@clamorworld.com, and we will share it on your behalf and assure to keep your name confidential. Let’s make this world a peaceful and a happy place to live. » Why Every Indian Woman, and Man, Should Watch This Short Film

Why Every Indian Woman, and Man, Should Watch This Short Film

The statistics invoked in a new short film titled ‘Dying To Be Me’ are a brutal reminder that it is the economic shackles of being a woman in India that prove the most binding. According to this video, Indian women make up half the country’s population, contribute to 70% of its working house and yet just earn 10% of India’s salary and a miserable 1% of its wealth.

‘Dying To Be Me,’ made by Indian-American filmmaker Deva Katta, was released to mark Independence Day and the message it drives home is the importance of economic independence.
The female protagonist in the two-minute film, played by actress-singer Smita, is educated, urban and qualified. Yet, she is as disenfranchised as the poorest, most rustic woman. Financial freedom is hers only when she takes control of her own life, wresting from a husband who seeks to cage her.

“Live free and let live free,” is the film’s conclusion.

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