echo ''; Clamorworld » In everyday life every one of us comes across various experiences, incidents which we either don’t share with anyone or share with family members and friends. Print media, electronic media and various medium shows the news, but its ends up showing one sided of the story. We never come to know the other side of story. With so much happening every day, every second across our neighborhood, society, and world it’s difficult for the news media to cover all the news. Many times we have felt wish we could share our voice, opinion, thoughts with the world. Many a times we have felt the frustration, anger and helplessness for not being able to do anything about an incident. Have you ever felt, for a good cause, you need support, but don’t know how to garner the support and attention. So, now you have an option “www.Clamorworld.com“. This is a platform to share everything you want to. A website 100% runs by the people for the people. The world is waiting to listen to your voice, the voice which has kept you suppressed so far. If you do not want to share the incident, event personally, please send it to us at contact@clamorworld.com, and we will share it on your behalf and assure to keep your name confidential. Let’s make this world a peaceful and a happy place to live. » Meet Maggie Doyne, CNN’s ‘Hero Of The Year 2015’ And A Doting Mother To 51 Nepalese Children

Meet Maggie Doyne, CNN’s ‘Hero Of The Year 2015’ And A Doting Mother To 51 Nepalese Children

 

Allow us to introduce you to an exceptional young woman, who packed her bags at the age of 18 in pursuit of a life that she had no clue would become the very foundation of her existence.Maggie Doyne, CNN’s ‘Hero of the Year 2015’ had just passed out of high school when she decided to take a gap year and travel before starting college. Little did she know that fate would take her miles away from home to a whole new life.

She had no clue about what she wanted to do in life. Not caring about living up to the established norms of the New Jerseyan society – to go to college and earn a living – she decided to explore the world she lived in, to find the person she was and to know her purpose she was supposed to serve in this vast cosmos.Her expeditions brought her to India at a time when Nepal was embroiled in a civil war. When she visited Nepal, she saw many children engaged in hard-labour, cutting rocks that they could sell. It was here when she met Hima – a 6-year-old girl who picked garbage. Maggie’s momentary decision, “I need to help her” was what changed the course that she had set her foot on.With $5000 that she had earned through her babysitting sessions back in New Jersey, Maggie bought a land in Surkhet, Nepal and built a home from the ground up for these children.

She had no clue about what she wanted to do in life. Not caring about living up to the established norms of the New Jerseyan society – to go to college and earn a living – she decided to explore the world she lived in, to find the person she was and to know her purpose she was supposed to serve in this vast cosmos.Her expeditions brought her to India at a time when Nepal was embroiled in a civil war. When she visited Nepal, she saw many children engaged in hard-labour, cutting rocks that they could sell. It was here when she met Hima – a 6-year-old girl who picked garbage. Maggie’s momentary decision, “I need to help her” was what changed the course that she had set her foot on.With $5000 that she had earned through her babysitting sessions back in New Jersey, Maggie bought a land in Surkhet, Nepal and built a home from the ground up for these children.

ForbesSoon she founded a non-profit foundation BlinkNow, and with a lot of support from the local Nepalese community, Maggie was able to establish the Kopila Valley Children’s Home, a loving abode for nearly 50 children, aged one to 19.

Over the course of time, Maggie adopted over 50 children, all orphans barring a few who had severely mentally-ill parents.

Maggie lives with her kids in the Kopila Valley Children’s Home, where they share household chores and meaningful family time. The kids love to eat momos and Maggie often conducts eating competitions to see who can eat the most. The current record is 37!ForbesThe kids at her school play soccer and partake in community projects, like building a home for an earthquake survivor. Older children are gearing up to become future journalists, scientists, engineers, and farmers.

Maggie DoyneAll Maggie wanted was to love and care for these children, and give them opportunities that would take them places. She did just that and is still doing it. With a heart full of compassion, anything is possible. 🙂

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