echo ''; Clamorworld » In everyday life every one of us comes across various experiences, incidents which we either don’t share with anyone or share with family members and friends. Print media, electronic media and various medium shows the news, but its ends up showing one sided of the story. We never come to know the other side of story. With so much happening every day, every second across our neighborhood, society, and world it’s difficult for the news media to cover all the news. Many times we have felt wish we could share our voice, opinion, thoughts with the world. Many a times we have felt the frustration, anger and helplessness for not being able to do anything about an incident. Have you ever felt, for a good cause, you need support, but don’t know how to garner the support and attention. So, now you have an option “www.Clamorworld.com“. This is a platform to share everything you want to. A website 100% runs by the people for the people. The world is waiting to listen to your voice, the voice which has kept you suppressed so far. If you do not want to share the incident, event personally, please send it to us at contact@clamorworld.com, and we will share it on your behalf and assure to keep your name confidential. Let’s make this world a peaceful and a happy place to live. » My wish to see the world’: BC canoeists find ashes with message in a bottle

My wish to see the world’: BC canoeists find ashes with message in a bottle

 

The ‘Soggy Beavers,’ a competitive canoe team, recently found a bottle bobbing in Victoria’s Inner Harbour.

Inside, they found a message and what appeared to be human ashes.
“It says something along the lines of, ‘If you find this, please throw it back in the ocean. My last wish was to see the world,’ Russell Henry, a member of the team, told CBC News. “And on the other side is a photo of a man and it says ‘Celebration of Life.’”
The team nicknamed the remains “Ash” — and decided to honour the request.
Next month, the Soggy Beavers will bring the bottle with them on their weeklong 1,200-kilometre race from Port Townsend, Washington, to Ketchikan, Alaska.
“There’s really no way he’s going to see much of the world (in the harbour),” Henry told CTVNews.ca.
“We don’t know who this man was, or exactly what his wishes were, but a tour up the entire BC coast and a jump start on this final journey of his seems like one small way to pay our respects,” the team posted on Facebook.
The team hopes they’ll be able to drop the bottle far enough north in the Pacific Ocean that currents will take it to Asia.
“But I think there’s always the chance we find somebody who says, ‘Hey I’m sailing to Japan,’ and we could hand him off. I think it would be cool, people just handing him off so he makes his way around the world,” Henry said.

Eager to know more of the man’s story, the team hopes the family of “Ash” gets in touch with them

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